Germany’s Circus Roncalli has a rich history. It has been one of the most prominent names on the European circus circuit since its inception in 1976. This June, however, it created a different sort of history, replacing its animal acts with 3D projections, or holograms. There were no real-life jumbo elephants or galloping horses wowing the crowds. Instead, the Roncalli performers were accompanied by holographic projections of elephants, horses and gigantic fish. Eleven laser projectors were used. This was a step away from the web of wildlife abuse and animal cruelty in the circus world, but it also shows how holograms are now being used increasingly for real-world applications. It was in 1948 that Hungarian-British physicist Dennis Gabor discovered holograms while working on methods to improve the quality of electron microscopes. Today, holograms have become one of the most exciting facets of visual display technology and digital communication. For most people, the understanding of a hologram is restricted to the security labels, also known as rainbow holograms, printed on the back of a phone’s battery or those embossed on credit cards. These holograms are also a security featur...